Digital Webbing Presents celebrates second anniversary

Fri, September 5th, 2003 at 12:00am PDT

Comic Books
Jonah Weiland, Executive Producer/Publisher

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Official Press Release

HAVERHILL, MA – DIGITAL WEBBING PRESENTS, the collaborative anthology from the web's acclaimed "talent engine," races toward its second anniversary with a collection of all new tales wrapped in a cover by Jason Howard and Hi-Fi.

The three-part spy thriller "The Gig" concludes this issue, courtesy of Glenn Jeffers, John Etienne and Travis Walton. Journalist Carter Rice is branded a traitor, and must escape from a firefight that erupts in a small Pakistani city.

"'The Gig' examines the USA's military involvement in the Middle East," says Jeffers. "I think it's important to write these kinds of stories."

"I liked the premise of the story, and its parallel to the Daniel Pearl incident," said penciller John Etienne. "Looking back, I had a ball drawing it!"

In the next story, by C.G. Kirby and Enzo Pertile, a hustler's drug deal goes wrong – it's not bad luck, it's "Pay Back."

"'Pay Back' is the first script I ever wrote for DIGITAL WEBBING PRESENTS, a nod to the crime genre and comics like 100 Bullets and Sin City," says Kirby. "Enzo's knocked out some terrific pencils – he's got a European style that's easily recognizable as his own."

Kevin D. Melrose and Peter Honrade present "Bad Elements." The story follows an aging mob enforcer as he introduces his nephew to the family business. But what starts as a typical "training day" soon turns into something altogether different.

"This story was an experiment for me," explains Melrose. "I wanted to tinker with mixing genres, but also write characters who are noble and likeable in their own way, even if they aren't really 'good.'"

Melrose has nothing but praise for Honrade's stark, simplistic artwork. "His style is perfect for the story – both cartoonish and edgy, like Herge meets Miller."

Troy Wall and Mitchell Breitweiser team for "Summer Days, Winter Nights."

"Ever know a man that turned forty years old, ran to a car dealership and bought an expensive sports car in an effort to feel young and different?" asks Wall. "Let's just say our protagonist goes a thousand steps further!"

Breitweiser, artist of Marvel/Epic's Phantom Jack, enjoyed the challenge of illustrating the story. "The intense mood pushed the limits of my artwork, forcing me to increase drama with subtle facial expression and experiment with lighting and design."

DIGITAL WEBBING PRESENTS #11 (40 pages, full color cover, b/w interiors, $2.95 US, $4.50 CAN) (ITEM NUMBER) is solicited in August's Previews for an October 15 release.

 
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