Second Max Allan Collins "Dick Tracy" volume hits shelves next week

Thu, June 3rd, 2004 at 12:00am PDT

Comic Books
Jonah Weiland, Executive Producer/Publisher

Official Press Release

DAYTON, Ohio: Checker Book Publishing Group has received word that Dick Tracy: The Collins Casefiles Vol. 2 (ISBN 0-9741664-8-0, $18.95 tpb) has arrived at the warehouses of all of its distribution partners, and should be hitting retail shelves by Monday, June 7.

The book is the second installment in Checker's reprinting of the classic newspaper detective strip as scripted by Road to Perdition writer Max Allan Collins.

Chester Gould, a veteran cartoonist, proposed his most legendary character, a dashing and daring detective for the newspaper comics page in 1931. Gould proposed titling his strip Plainclothes Tracy, but Tribune head General Joseph Medill Patterson renamed him Dick Tracy before giving him a slot in the paper. Modeled in the image of the innovative Sherlock Holmes, Gould was inspired to create new crime-fighting technology, including the two-way wrist TV, closed circuit TV police line-up and the engineless car that took Dick Tracy to the moon.

Gould produced the Tracy strip himself for 46 years before its daily demands became too much and he turned scripting duties over to the mystery and comics writer, Max Allan Collins, and the art to his longtime assistant Rick Fletcher. When Fletcher passed away, pencilling duties over the remainder of Collins tenure were given over to Dick Locher, a future Pulitzer Prize winning political cartoonist. Gould maintained a role in the direction of Tracy's adventures for less than a year before it was turned entirely over to Collins, and Gould left the strip's byline after nearly 50 years.

Checker Book Publishing Group was established in 2000 to bring the absolute best of dormant, unpublished, and underpublished serial comics material back to print. A private concern, Checker fabricates complete, durable and affordable cartoon trade books for sale to such comic shops, bookstores and libraries as may require them for resale or public archiving. These endeavors are pursued with stalwart vigor by certain residents of Dayton, Ohio, in which city the press maintains its offices.

 
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