The Power of SHAZAM! #48

by Doug Zawisza, Reviewer |

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Story by
Eric Wallace
Art by
Don Kramer, Michael Babinski
Colors by
J.D. Smith
Letters by
Rob Leigh
Cover by
Jerry Ordway, Alex Sinclair
Publisher
DC Comics
Cover Price
$2.99 (USD)
Release Date
Jan 13th, 2010

Thu, January 14th, 2010 at 7:39PM (PST)


Eric Wallace steps up to deliver a tale of woe starring Osiris -- the equivalent of Captain Marvel, Jr. from Black Adam's family. The character was brought onto the scene in the pages of "52," where he also met his untimely demise. Wallace's characterization of Osiris is the best I've read with this character, and made this issue quite a compelling read. Add in Osiris's killer, Sobek, and the story goes where no other "Blackest Night" tie-in has gone to this point.

Don Kramer's art is stunning. I've praised his work in the pages of "JSA vs. Kobra," and for good reason. His artwork has hints of photorealism without seeming blatantly pirated from photographs. There is a liveliness to his characters that fits comic books that many other photo-realistic artists fail to deliver. Kramer also makes Billy and Mary look related, no small feat for comic artists in any generation. Their shared page in this issue has me hoping that maybe, just maybe, Kramer can be involved in some capacity once DC decides it is time to revive the "SHAZAM!" brand once more.

All that said, I am a more than a little puzzled as to why this particular title was chosen for "resurrection." Sure, it is a good story, with a compelling dilemma for our hero who, although possessed by a Black Lantern ring, still performs heroic deeds.

We're given a little more insight behind what forces might be able to challenge the Black Lanterns, this story stars dead characters, but to have an issue like this centered around a character that never existed in the title being resurrected seems like a poor choice. The solicits offered readers a chance to revisit with Billy and Mary Batson, but the pair appear only for one page, used more as a plot device to catch readers up on what happened as opposed to being protagonists in what should have been their story.