The Atom and Hawkman #46

by Doug Zawisza, Reviewer |

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Story by
Geoff Johns
Art by
Ryan Sook, Fernando Pasarin
Colors by
Hi-Fi
Letters by
Nick J. Napolitano
Cover by
Ryan Sook
Publisher
DC Comics
Cover Price
$2.99 (USD)
Release Date
Jan 27th, 2010

Thu, January 28th, 2010 at 7:28PM (PST)


After nearly forty-one years, the Titan and the Fury are reunited under the title they once shared. Problem is, the winged fury is dead, reanimated by the forces of evil and trying to kill his old pal Ray Palmer. The duo's last issue featured an insane Jean Loring as their adversary, but this issue puts Jean on the same side as Hawkman -- the side of the Black Lanterns -- as they try to kill the Atom.

Newly minted Indigo Lantern Ray Palmer is tasked with the duty of protecting Indigo-1, but in doing so he has to face down his best friend and his ex-wife. Johns captures and shares a sliver of the emotions that erupt from Palmer during this adventure, giving us a tightly encapsulated version of the events that placed the Atom under the thrall of the Indigo Lantern. We also learn a little more about the Indigo Lanterns' powers.

The art is split between two very confident, yet different artists, and each delivers their side of the story with the best of their ability. The transition from Ryan Sook's first half of this issue to Fernando Pasarin's latter pages is surprisingly not as jarring as one might expect from two artists with such different styles. Johns helps accommodate this shift with a scene shift in the story, moving the battleground into the ring of Indigo-1.

I was pleasantly surprised to discover just how much this issue seemingly advanced the overall "Blackest Night" story. I'm sure the events here will be summarized to some degree in "Blackest Night" #7, but this issue makes a nice addition to the greater "Blackest Night" saga. Palmer's dedication and final request elevates my anticipation of "Blackest Night" #7.

This is a nice tribute to the Atom and Hawkman stories of yesteryear -– both the ones under the title of "The Atom and Hawkman" and elsewhere, be it in "Hawkman" under the pen of Geoff Johns or in the Silver Age issues of either character's solo titles. Sook and Pasarin both make solid cases to work on the Atom more in the future, and I would gladly welcome the art of either.