NOLA #4

by Doug Zawisza, Reviewer |

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Cover Price
$3.99 (USD)
Release Date
Mar 3rd, 2010

Sat, March 6th, 2010 at 5:39PM (PST)


Equal parts "Punisher," "Jon Sable," "Jonah Hex," and "Dirty Harry," "NOLA" wraps up its four-issue vengeance-fueled rampage here. This tale is a story from the tragic recent past of the "City That Care Forgot." Only in the immediate aftermath of Katrina could a cathartic release of aggression be meted out without dire consequences.

Of course, the end of this series leaves the story wide open to continue on, whether that be into the maw of said consequences or further into vengeance. After the rampage she went on and the loose ends she's left dangling, I can't imagine any potential sequel to be without some pretty intense struggles.

This story doesn't break new ground, but rather digs into to the ground next to similar stories, offering slightly different twists and new combinations of older ideas. There's really only two options for the ending of a tale of revenge. Gorak and Cothran do a fine job of providing an interesting read throughout the story though. The methods and means by which Nola accomplishes her task does offer some intriguing moments. The gunfight in the car, while extreme to the point of being absurd (is there really THAT much room in a Mercedes?) offers a parallel to where this story started while dropping in some much needed drama to start this issue off.

Like some of BOOM!'s other titles, such as "Potter's Field," "Irredeemable," and "Incorruptible," "NOLA" offers a change of pace from standard comic book fare. This isn't as hard-boiled as "100 Bullets," nor quite as driven as "Punisher."

Courciero's art is nice in its celebration of contrast, but light on details and backgrounds more often than not. The color palette in this book rarely strays from the beige-tan-olive-gray range, making the violent bloodlettings more intense.

backdrop of New Orleans and timing of this story being post-Katrina aren't played up as much as they could have been, or perhaps they're just not played up as much as I expected them to be. When all is said and done, this book is just another bullet-filled story of vengeance. It's not one that I'm likely to remember months from now.