Justice League: Generation Lost #1

by Doug Zawisza, Reviewer |

Wed, May 12th, 2010 at 8:24PM (PDT)


Behind the standard-issue, Tony Harris-drawn, Michael Keaton-Teri Garr-Katey Sagal tribute cover, the first issue of "Justice League: Generation Lost" carries a hefty thirty-two pages worth of story.

There's some sloppiness in this book beyond the choice of making the Maguire covers the hard-to-find, expensive-to-buy variant collector's edition covers. When we first meet Booster Gold in this issue, he's in Russia at the decommissioned J. L. I. embassy, or as the caption calls it, "the sight of the decommissioned J. L. I. embassy." I'm willing to let that one slip, but on the facing page, Power Girl demands of Booster Gold, "What are doing here!?" Oh, and for some reason, Captain Atom's blue boots are red here. Minor nits that have now been picked.

OK. That's off my chest. The story itself is a bit of a flashback or set-up to what happened between "Blackest Night" #8 and "Brightest Day" #0, at least as far as it concerns Maxwell Lord IV. This issue reveals the why (sort of) behind the four characters remembering Max.

Giffen and Winick do a great job of introducing the cast of characters to readers. Booster Gold is front and center in this book and the other characters -- Captain Atom, Fire, and Ice -- just seem to be along for the ride right now. That said, there are plenty of cameos from various other denizens of the DC Universe, so there's little mistaking where this book is set, and Aaron Lopresti does a fantastic job of drawing this book. I love that Giffen is providing breakdowns for the issue (and hopefully the rest of the series) and it strengthens the legacy bond between this title and the "Justice League International" of old.

The story itself is a bit of a letdown. This seems like a pretty cut-and-dry story to me, hardly worthy of twenty-six issues: show some DVR or internet footage of Max to the JLA -- after all, Max wiped minds, not technology -- find Max, and do a little mindwipe of Maxwell Lord for a change.

That, however, doesn't appear to be on the table as the series is set to run biweekly for a year. Giffen was on "Justice League International" for over one hundred issues ("Justice League," "Justice League America," and "Justice League Europe") with various and sundry specials and annuals along the way, so there's a tremendous amount of history to draw from. Theres's no shortage of material to draw from. I just hope a little more care and attention are given to those future issues.

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Justice League: Generation Lost #20
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Justice League: Generation Lost #19
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