Iceman & Angel #1

by Ryan K. Lindsay, Reviewer |

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Story by
Brian Clevinger
Art by
Juan Doe
Letters by
Jeff Eckleberry
Cover by
Roger Cruz
Publisher
Marvel Comics
Cover Price
$2.99 (USD)
Release Date
Mar 16th, 2011

Sat, March 19th, 2011 at 8:17PM (PDT)


“Iceman & Angel” is the team-up no one asked for and no one is waiting for. But it’s by Brian Clevinger and Juan Doe; Those are two creators many do wait for. This is worth your wait. It’s as much fun as you want, but as pithy as you expect too.

It takes a little while for Clevinger to get the back and forth between Angel and Iceman going, but once he slips into it there is much to delight at. The dialogue is snappy (yeah, snappy is definitely the word) in a way you expect from a Clevinger script. They point out things you wish you were smart enough to have thought of. It isn’t all just base humor, either. If anything, this is cerebral comedy. This is a study of what these characters are and why they work, even when they shouldn’t. You get the feeling Clevinger asked for these two specifically because they’re not the heavy hitters and they’re not as exposed as other one-eyed mutants or those that go snikt in the night.

It must be said that Doe isn’t great at drawing Bobby Drake or Warren Worthington III. They don’t look right, but his Goom looks so right as to possibly be the rightest thing in comics this week. The idea of Doe drawing Goom was always going to be a draw. From the amount of panel space Goom takes up, you know everyone involved in making this comic agrees with that thought. We get what we want in droves.

Iceman goes off in a diatribe of dramatic irony as he describes why Angel needs metal wings. He goes into quite some detail and it makes me think that if this is canon, Worthington should have been extremely suspicious when Apocalypse would follow that plan much later exactly as Drake lays out. It’s almost too convenient and I’d never trust my friend again for being so on the mark. But maybe the conversation is played more for humor than actual seriousness. . . It is possible.

A one-shot should be a comic that stands on its own, and this issue certainly does that. It needs to give you enough narrative meat to feel like the money was well invested, and this issue mostly does that. It should elicit some form of strong reaction from you in the few pages it has, and this issue works hard to make you laugh and is more successful than not. See Namor score some bagels and Googam become a broheim. It’s not earth shattering but it is solid fun and sometimes that’s just what you need. Pick up this comic and feel the freedom of old funny done-in-one comics just like they did when you were a kid where the parts add up to greater than the actual whole.