Legion Lost #7

by Greg McElhatton, Reviewer |

Send This to a Friend

Separate multiple email address with commas.

You must state your name.

You must enter your email address.

Story by
Tom DeFalco
Art by
Pete Woods
Colors by
Brad Anderson
Letters by
Travis Lanham
Cover by
Pete Woods, Brad Anderson
Publisher
DC Comics
Cover Price
$2.99 (USD)
Release Date
Mar 14th, 2012

Thu, March 15th, 2012 at 10:22AM (PDT)


After its debut sadly did nothing for me, I decided it was a good time to give "Legion Lost" another try as Tom DeFalco joins artist Pete Woods due to crossover with "Teen Titans" and "Superboy." I was curious to see what this modern-day spin-off from "Legion of Super-Heroes" was up to.

With DeFalco taking over the title, "Legion Lost" has shifted location to New York and while the overall plot of looking for the spreader of the Hypertaxis virus is still present, most of this issue involves Tellus trying to help a mental cry for help while Timber Wolf looks to get money for the team. It's a strange combination of plots, in no small part because both end rather abruptly. Tellus' story at least comes to a logical conclusion once you find out exactly what's happening to the mysterious Katia, but Timber Wolf's story feels distinctly unfinished. Presumably once "The Culling" crossover concludes DeFalco will return to this plot, but for now it feels so jarring that it makes me wonder why DeFalco hadn't just waited until after the crossover to even begin it.

Woods, on the other hand, is creating some beautiful art on "Legion Lost." He and colorist Brad Anderson make Tellus' telepathic world look rich and attractive and Tellus' mental form in particular manages to both look non-threatening to an average person and also distinctly powerful and obviously Tellus. His storytelling is strong, too; just look at that opening page with the close-ups on Katia's eyes interspersed with the memory flashes of the gurney, the bindings, and the syringe. It's creepy and dangerous looking, it gets across DeFalco's ideas, and it grabs your attention in a matter of minutes.

"Legion Lost" got off to an extremely rocky start, but I'm feeling like the book is finding its way now. Once "The Culling" has wrapped up we'll have a stronger feel for the new direction from DeFalco and Woods, but for now it's piqued my interest in a way that #1 failed to do. Consider me interested in seeing what's in store for the 21st century Legion next and on board for the next couple of months. Well done, DeFalco and Woods.

SIMILAR REVIEWS

Legion Lost #16
Posted Wed, January 16th

Legion Lost #0
Posted Mon, September 17th

Legion Lost #10
Posted Thu, June 14th

Legion Lost #9
Posted Fri, May 11th

Legion Lost #6
Posted Thu, February 9th