Hexed #3

by Doug Zawisza, Reviewer |

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Story by
Michael Alan Nelson
Art by
Emma Rios
Colors by
Cris Peter
Letters by
Marshall Dillon
Cover by
Emma Rios, Joe Pekar
Publisher
Boom! Studios
Cover Price
$3.99 (USD)
Release Date
Mar 11th, 2009

Mon, March 16th, 2009 at 4:44PM (PDT)


The legacy of the carasinth continues in this issue. In the last issue, Lucifer (or Luci Jennifer Inagcio Das Neves) and Dietrich crossed over into the Harlot's realm. It is there that Nelson writes Lucifer at the crossroads, forced to choose between a war with Dietrich or submission to him. Dietrich attempts to strike the first fatal blow, lashing out at Lucifer's mentor and the only person she can call "friend." Nelson's writing and Rios' art pace this book almost as a set of storyboards, giving "Hexed" a feeling of readiness for live action.

Rios' art is solid throughout this issue, as it has been in the two previous. Consistency is critical is a book looking to claim a stake in this economy with the new comic racks chock full of "Crises" and "Invasions" crossovers and batting practice. While much of Rios' work has a manga-esque economy of line and shadow, Rios makes Lucifer's world a real one, complete with various textures and shades when the setting allows for it, focusing on characters in challenging settings and sneaking in detail when the pace of the story allows.

Cris Peter colors this book with hellish tones that make the scenes set in realms beyond truly unsettling. When confronted with a dire situation in our world, the tones take on glaring yellow and bluish-green hues when Lucifer is placed under arrest. Together with Rios, Peter makes this book the visual spectacle it is. One of them without the other would be incomplete at this point.

This book has been flawlessly paced, with the biggest downer being each month gives us only a score of pages. The cliffhangers are almost tactile and this one, in particular is no less emotional for its diminutive size -– barely a quarter of the page. No doubt, "Hexed" was written as a sum total of its episodic pieces, but it is broken up nicely where each month has given us some adventure, insight into Lucifer's world and excitement at what next month will bring.

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